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How to Make a Macrame Wall Hanging for Beginners

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Want to learn how to macrame and make cool wall hangings? This decor trend has made a comeback recently and we’ll show you how to make your own gorgeous wall hanging! A perfect craft for any skill-level and great for those days at home

How to Make a Macrame Wall Hanging

In today’s busy world, it’s easy to feel overwhelmed. But hey, who says we can’t add a little zen to our lives? That’s where macramé comes in – it’s like a mini vacation for your mind!

Making a macramé wall hanging isn’t just a craft project, it’s a chance to slow down, get creative, and maybe even find your inner chill. Whether you’re a DIY pro or a total newbie, playing with knots and yarn is surprisingly satisfying.

In this beginner’s guide, we’re gonna keep it simple and fun. We’ll walk you through everything from picking out materials to mastering those funky knots. So grab your favorite drink, find a comfy spot, and let’s get ready to make some magic happen in your space! If you made a friendship bracelet as a kid, the good news is you’re well on your way!

Where did macrame come from?

The art of macrame trend from the 70’s has made a definitive comeback. First a little background on macrame: 

The origins of macramé are somewhat unclear as it’s believed to have developed independently in various cultures throughout history. However, it’s commonly thought that macramé originated in ancient times, possibly as early as the 13th century, in regions around the Mediterranean, including Arabia, North Africa, and China.

Macramé gained popularity during the 19th century in Europe, particularly among sailors who used knotting techniques to create decorative and functional items aboard ships. Sailors would often pass their time at sea by making items like hammocks, bell fringes, and decorative covers using macramé.

The craft further evolved during the Victorian era, where it became a popular pastime for affluent women who created intricate lace-like designs using knotting techniques. Macramé experienced a revival during the 1960s and 1970s as part of the counterculture movement, and its popularity has continued to ebb and flow through the decades.

So while the exact date of its creation is unknown, macramé has a rich history spanning centuries and cultures, evolving from practical maritime applications to decorative and artistic pursuits.

Making My Own Macrame

I wanted to give it a try, instead of paying for the *beautiful*, but heavily priced, retail options. With this becoming a popular craft, I thought I could find some online videos to help.  There was a picture online of one that I liked, but I had no luck of finding a FREE tutorial for that one in particular. I figured I would still give it a shot based on the basic macramé knot I had learned. Here is my version for you! It’s a great way to get started on macrame patterns and create some art!
 
how to macrame - Splendry
 

Different Macrame Basic Knots

There are numerous types of knots used in macramé, each creating different textures and patterns. Some common macrame knots include:

  1. Square Knot (SK): A fundamental knot formed by tying two half knots in opposite directions. It’s often used to create diagonal lines and dense patterns.
  2. Half Knot (HK): A basic knot formed by looping one cord over another. It’s often used as a building block for more complex knots or as a decorative element.
  3. Double Half Hitch (DHH): Consists of two half hitch knots worked consecutively. It’s used to create a diagonal line or vertical lines and to secure cords to a base.
  4. Josephine Knot: A decorative knot formed by looping cords around a core in a specific pattern. It creates a round, intricate design often used in jewelry or as a focal point in macramé pieces.
  5. Lark’s Head Knot: Created by folding a cord in half and looping the folded end over a rod or another cord, then pulling the loose ends through the loop. It’s commonly used to attach cords to a dowel or ring. (There’s also a reverse lark’s head knot.)
  6. Clove Hitch: A knot used to secure a cord to an object, such as a dowel or ring, by wrapping the cord around the object and then crossing it over itself.
  7. Alternating Square Knot (ASK): Similar to the square knot but alternating the working cords, creating a spiral effect. It’s often used in plant hangers and wall hangings.
  8. Berry Knot (BK): A decorative knot resembling a berry or bead, formed by wrapping one cord around another in a specific pattern.

These are just a few examples, and there are many more variations and combinations of knots used in macramé to achieve different effects and designs. If you want to get more info on specific knows, pull up a YouTube video for each type and it will walk you through it! There are definitely some simple knots perfect for beginners and knots that are a little bit more advanced and a video tutorial will help. Start wherever you are on your macrame journey! 

Once you’re comfortable making your first knot, it’s just a matter of time until your skill level improves and you can make all kinds of beautiful patterns!

This post contains affiliate links meaning purchases made through included links may result in Splendry earning a commission at non cost to you.

Macrame supplies used: 

how to macrame supplies - Splendry

Find a flat surface to spread out and let’s get started on this DIY tutorial! We have step-by-step instructions for making this wall hanging.

Steps:

1. Your first step: Beginning from 1/2 inch above the hoop, bend your (un-cut) cord then pull the ends down as far as you think you would like them to hang. 
 
how to macrame - Splendry
 
2. Use the first cord to measure the remaining cords you want to use. I used 16 cord strands. (How much cord you need will depend on the size of your project.) 
 
3. With each of the strings, fold each one in half making a loop at the top. Place the loop behind the ring then pull the loose hanging ends in front of the ring and through the loop. Pull tight. 
 
how to make a macrame wall hanging - Splendry
 
how to make a macrame wall hanging - Splendry
 
 
macrame diy tutorial
 
4. Next step, using half of the knots, you will take an individual cord strand and pull it down diagonally to the bottom of the ring. Knot the strand to the hoop, pull it tight so that the diagonal portion is taught.
 
Let the remaining loose end hang down as part of your fringe for later. Repeat with the rest of ONE side. 
 
how to macrame - Splendry
 
how to macrame - Splendry
 
5. With the other half of your cords, you are going to weave each strand under an opposite strand. I started at the top with the closest strand to the diagonal I just made.
 
I pulled the current strand under the first diagonal strand, then knot it diagonally at the other end of the hoop just like before. 
 
With each subsequent strand you will pull it under the NEXT diagonal strand. When you finish you should have a ‘ V ‘ shape in the middle of your hoop. 
 
how to make a macrame wall hanging - Splendry

Now for the fringe!

6. Cut 18 strands where they are long enough to loop and hang the same length as your previous strands. 
 
7. Starting with the outside of the strands, make your same loop knot as you did at the top of the hoop.
 
Repeat with each strand in between the single knotted strands (the new strands alternate in between the knots already made) ending with one on the outside of your other end. 
 
how to make a macrame wall hanging - Splendry
 
how to make a macrame wall hanging - Splendry
 
how to make a macrame wall hanging - Splendry
 
8. To fill out your fringe now you want to pull apart the strands (this was the methodical part to me!)
 
I chose to pull apart each strand completely except for a scattered few that I only did partly so that there would be a little hidden depth here and there. 
 
how to make a macrame wall hanging - Splendry
 
how to make a macrame wall hanging - Splendry
 
9. Finally, add a hanging string at the top, and put it on your wall! Done!
 
how to macrame - Splendry
 
I hope you like my first project! Let me know if you try making one yourself!

Looking for more macrame projects that are truly gorgeous pieces? We have some ideas that are great beginner projects for you!

 

How to Make a Macrame Wall Hanging

how to make macrame - Splendry

Want to learn how to macrame? This decor trend has made a comeback recently and we’ll show you how to make your own gorgeous wall hanging

Materials

  • 12″ Gold Metal Ring
  • 3mm White Macrame Cord
  • Scissors

Instructions

    1. Beginning from 1/2 inch above the hoop, bend your {un-cut} cord then pull the ends down as far as you think you would like them to hang. 

    2. Use the first cord to measure the remaining cords you want to use. I used 16 cord strands. 

    3. With each of the strings, fold each one in half making a loop at the top. Place the loop behind the ring then pull the loose hanging ends in front of the ring and through the loop. Pull tight. 

    4. Next, using half of the knots, you will take an individual cord strand and pull it down diagonally to the bottom of the ring. Knot the strand to the hoop, pull it tight so that the diagonal portion is taught. Let the remaining loose end hang down as part of your fringe for later. Repeat with the rest of ONE side. 

    5. With the other half of your cords, you are going to weave each strand under an opposite strand. I started at the top with the closest strand to the diagonal I just made. I pulled the current strand under the first diagonal strand, then knot it diagonally at the other end of the hoop just like before. With each subsequent strand you will pull it under the NEXT diagonal strand. When you finish you should have a ‘ V ‘ shape in the middle of your hoop. 

    6. For the fringe, cut 18 strands where they are long enough to loop and hang the same length as your previous strands. 

    7. Starting with the outside of the strands, make your same loop knot as you did at the top of the hoop. Repeat with each strand in between the single knotted strands (the new strands alternate in between the knots already made) ending with one on the outside of your other end. 

    8. To fill out your fringe now you want to pull apart the strands (this was the methodical part to me!). I chose to pull apart each strand completely except for a scattered few that I only did partly so that there would be a little hidden depth here and there. 

    9. Finally, add a hanging string at the top, and put it on your wall! Done!

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Lisa

Friday 29th of September 2023

I can’t wait to make this. How long is each cord?

dulce ramirez

Saturday 23rd of May 2020

que padre queda y muy bien explicado parece muy fácil de hacer lo haré el día de hoy. y te comunicaré el resultado. gracias!!!

Michelle L Lutz

Wednesday 19th of February 2020

Can you clarify step 5? I'm having trouble knowing where to weave.. Thanks. I love this design and hope to make it.

Aubrie

Wednesday 19th of February 2020

Hi Michelle! I had to play with this a little to get it to hold, since I was just creating my own based on a picture...but, taking each individual strand (there are two to a loop knot), start under the most nearby tied strand going diagonally left, and about halfway pull it back forward. This will help keep it in place. Then tie your knot to the far left of the hoop. It might help to enlarge the picture on that step, too. Your might look a little different than mine, but the key to keeping the shape is the weaving in and out of the opposite, tied strands. By the end of step 5, all of the strings from your right group should be all the way to the left of the first group of knots. Once they are all tied at the bottom you can push them together, and tighten the strings and knots. this will naturally help keep the diamond in place. I hope this helps!!

Michelle L Lutz

Tuesday 18th of February 2020

I'm having so much trouble figuring out the step 5 where you weave and tie the strings from the right under the left. I am not getting a V. Can you enlighten me??? Please??

marizza

Wednesday 8th of January 2020

Did you use both balls of macrame cord for this project or just 1 (amazon comes in a two pack)

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